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But the part it gets wrong is that if you look at who actually works in Silicon Valley now, the geek contingent - the stereotypical socially awkward hackers - is no longer the dominant phenotype of SIlicon Valley. Now it’s people who are well adjusted, good looking graduates of elite institutions. It’s gone from weirdos in pocket protectors to the guys who used to go to Wall Street.

I talked to one guy who’s a former Goldman Sachs guy who left to go to the tech industry who said the adage in the tech world now is “be wary when the pretty people show up.”

Kevin Roose. “How Wall Street recruits so many insecure Ivy League grads” (via peterspear)

Todd’s Take: If I’m in tech startups, then the pretty people have far from taken over yet thankfully #toofat #totaldork #cantdress

The Midwest cannot rely on coastal VCs to build the startup community here. They get enough deal flow right where they are. The only reason for them to come to the Midwest is to cherry pick the best deals. If the Midwest is going to have a sustainable startup ecosystem, the money has to come from the Midwest high net worth individuals, Midwest family offices, Midwest pension funds, Midwest corporations, Midwest fund of funds and banks.

Levering Up The Buggy Whip Factories http://pointsandfigures.com/2014/06/27/24338/ (via pointsnandfigures)

this is exactly right

(via fred-wilson)

Try for any region

rickwebb:

Lego Star Wars Epsode VII read through.

rickwebb:

Lego Star Wars Epsode VII read through.

rafer:

Rafer sez:Photography is finally building the commercial footprint that a bunch of us fogies dreamed about, and the investment world is jumping in to figure it out. Per Instagram and Snapchat, photos have been a fabulous distribution loss leader, but profit is on the horizon. Ubiquitous imaging is about to change the world even more than phone cameras did. I spent a lot of the ’90s on mobile imaging when the phones were still too far from reality. No one could yet make money or even gain distribution. Just 15 years later, Neuromancer is about to show up. Molly Millions might just get her specs this decade. 
While the most visually dramatic apps are still the vertical ones, like APX pictured above, the every day uses are coming. Last year, a pal of mine tried to ship an iPad app that let you point the camera at a pile of Ikea parts and it would highlight the which hole to address with which screw.  Google is getting into the act at an industrial level with a new tablet prototype.
Much as Gibson feared when he wrote Neuromancer, Molly’s eyepieces might well respond to OK Google, Hello Amazon, or FML Facebook. The open source stack for smart mobile and wearable devices has not emerged. History tells us the open stack emerges once the hardware commoditizes, but that’s a nervewracking, decades-long wait. I’m encouraged that open commoditization is happening already in Google, Facebook, and Amazon’s clouds, but I might be rationalizing.  
While we’re waiting, advertising, and ecommerce are going to be footing the bill for whole visual communications shebang. Photo ads will matter on Pinterest, Instagram, and far across the mobile internet. The first real discussion of the challenges and opportunities of profitable businesses in this sector will be at Vision Summit in NYC next week. The guy putting it on — Evan Nisselson — of LDV Capital is an incredibly focused seed investor in imaging, and he’s put together a great day. 
Get to New York next week.

rafer:

Rafer sez:
Photography is finally building the commercial footprint that a bunch of us fogies dreamed about, and the investment world is jumping in to figure it out. Per Instagram and Snapchat, photos have been a fabulous distribution loss leader, but profit is on the horizon. Ubiquitous imaging is about to change the world even more than phone cameras did. I spent a lot of the ’90s on mobile imaging when the phones were still too far from reality. No one could yet make money or even gain distribution. Just 15 years later, Neuromancer is about to show up. Molly Millions might just get her specs this decade. 

While the most visually dramatic apps are still the vertical ones, like APX pictured above, the every day uses are coming. Last year, a pal of mine tried to ship an iPad app that let you point the camera at a pile of Ikea parts and it would highlight the which hole to address with which screw.  Google is getting into the act at an industrial level with a new tablet prototype.

Much as Gibson feared when he wrote Neuromancer, Molly’s eyepieces might well respond to OK GoogleHello Amazon, or FML Facebook. The open source stack for smart mobile and wearable devices has not emerged. History tells us the open stack emerges once the hardware commoditizes, but that’s a nervewracking, decades-long wait. I’m encouraged that open commoditization is happening already in Google, Facebook, and Amazon’s clouds, but I might be rationalizing.  

While we’re waiting, advertising, and ecommerce are going to be footing the bill for whole visual communications shebang. Photo ads will matter on Pinterest, Instagram, and far across the mobile internet. The first real discussion of the challenges and opportunities of profitable businesses in this sector will be at Vision Summit in NYC next week. The guy putting it on — Evan Nisselson — of LDV Capital is an incredibly focused seed investor in imaging, and he’s put together a great day. 

Get to New York next week.

(via High-Rise Apartment Buildings Sprout in Downtowns Nationwide - WSJ.com)

"It’s the Manhattanization of America and it’s happening in cities that never had rental high rises," says Mark Humphreys, chief executive of Dallas-based Humphreys & Partners Architects, which specializes in apartments and condominiums.

Todd says: Great data for the urbanization trend in America

(via High-Rise Apartment Buildings Sprout in Downtowns Nationwide - WSJ.com)

"It’s the Manhattanization of America and it’s happening in cities that never had rental high rises," says Mark Humphreys, chief executive of Dallas-based Humphreys & Partners Architects, which specializes in apartments and condominiums.

Todd says: Great data for the urbanization trend in America

bijan:

This morning Governor Deval Patrick will make it clear he is seeking an end to employee non compete agreements in our state*

Employee non compete agreements are not enforceable and are deemed illegal in California. Yet the opposite is true in MA. They are used and enforced. And because of this they…

hopsandchops:

Come bid Daryn good tidings as he heads off to Porch — we’ll be gathering for a pop-up Hops & Chops on Tuesday, April 15 at Auto Battery.  Come by any time after 6pm — we should be there til 8ish. 

hopsandchops:

Come bid Daryn good tidings as he heads off to Porch — we’ll be gathering for a pop-up Hops & Chops on Tuesday, April 15 at Auto Battery.  Come by any time after 6pm — we should be there til 8ish. 

Romans had very few first names, so they started numbering their kids.

Hence Tertius, Quartus, Quintus, Sextus, Septimus, Octavus, and their various diminutives.

So you might have brothers that are numbers. In other words, if Gaius Iulius Caesar had had legitimate male offspring, the first would have also been Gaius Iulius Caesar, the second Secundus Iulius Caesar, the Third Octavus and so on.

This gets confusing when someone like like the fictional Quintus Iulius Caesar has children. His first born son will usually be Quintus, but will his second be Secundus? No, he may be Sextus. However, if there is already a living Sextus Iulius Caesar, you may go with a diminutive, such as Quintillus, or you may cherry pick a later number out of order, such as Decimus.

None of this applies to women. Their father’s last name became their first name. Thus, Gaius Julius Caesar had a daughter, Julia. (What looks like a Roman middle name is actually the last name to our mind. Nobody called Caesar Caesar. He was known to his friends as Gaius and the public Iulius. The Caesar was appended from time to time to distinguish him from other people with last name. ) Ocatavianus had Octavia. Agrippa had Agrippina (the elder). She was a complete and total nut job - crazy as loon. Second and third daughters often had exactly the same name as their sisters, with a nickname that honors an ancestor appended. The second they were married, their first name was their father’s last name and their last name was their husband’s.

In this way most Roman names live on today as women’s names. Julii family, aside from having one son named Gaius Iulius Caesar, had many, many daughters named Julia. Thus Claudia, Amelia, Octavia, Melissa, and their associated names like Julie and Emily are with us today, particularly among folks whose native tongues are Romance Languages.

For the boys, we get Trey and Quin. A fifth. A cokehead named after a bottle. Go figure.

A quote from a college buddy who is a high school classics teacher. 

#youlearnsomethingneweveryday

New Jersey equals a banana republic of the old Soviet Union — like Kyrgyzstan or whatever. The dealers are rent seeking and it’s clearly not in the interest of consumers. Instead it’s promoting the interests of an industry that deserves to die because it’s not efficient and doesn’t serve consumers. That’s because rent seekers don’t create anything of value.

Tomasello’s account of how co-operation drove the development of our distinctive intellect is controversial – Bekoff too would point to the growing body of evidence on how other species co-operate. It is also highly speculative: a trait such as co-operation leaves few traces in the fossil record. But it is speculation by a thinker at the top of his field, based on the latest research, and as such is likely to be the definitive statement of human uniqueness for some time to come.

His account also makes me feel better about not having invented the iPad or landed on the moon: it suggests that these are indeed triumphs of the human spirit, but not because they sprang from the minds of lone superhumans. Rather, it is because they are products of the distinctively human practice of putting heads together.

What sets humanity apart - FT.com

Sawickipedia says: Great quote and rightly shows, without saying it, we likely celebrate the individual (someone like Steve Jobs) when the team (the company Apple) more truthfully deserves the credit.